{ 4 comments }

Richard Ferry November 26, 2014 at 8:43 am
22 of 23 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars
We didn’t see THIS in the movies!, January 11, 2003
By 
Richard Ferry (San Jose, California United States) –
(REAL NAME)
  

This review is from: Last Train From Berlin: An Eye-Witness Account of Germany at War (Paperback)
Howard K. Smith’s 60 year old writing has an urgent, compelling feel which seems very relevant to our times. With personal anecdotes, facts and figures he illuminates the seduction of the German middle class into Nazism and their eventual betrayal and ruination by Hitler’s policies. The internal fracture between eager industrialists who got on board with Hitler and the older, more conservative, landed gentry & industrialists who didn’t like Hitler, but feared Bolsheviks even more, parallels the conflict between the established Prussian officer corp and the up and coming Wehrmacht and SS organizations. All this while the country began to bleed dry because of Hitler’s crazed decision to attack Russia. Civilians endured huge hardships and shortages while at the same time Germany’s military machine almost won the war. Smith’s book is outstanding in that it gives the texture of daily life for Germans and how they resisted in small ways but ultimately rationalized the war under the renentless pounding of Nazi propaganda . Vivid descriptions of harrassment by the Gestapo of Smith and others in the foreigh correspondent sector. He emerges as an outspoken advocate for social change in the USA as well. easy, engaging read.

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R.J. Corby November 26, 2014 at 8:53 am
10 of 10 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars
A well-done, first-hand account of Berlin during war, December 10, 2002
By 
R.J. Corby (Irvine, CA, U.S.A.) –

This review is from: Last Train From Berlin: An Eye-Witness Account of Germany at War (Paperback)
Howard K. Smith does a great job of describing his experiences in detail about his time spent in Berlin during the first few years of World War II.
During the final two-thirds of the book, the reader is a companion to Smith as he describes his increasingly darkening experiences in Berlin, culminating with his departure to Switzerland on the day the Japanese bombed Pearl Harbor. Following the bombing, the Germans wouldn’t allow anyone to leave the country, so Smith just made it.
My two chief complaints about the book:
1. It ends too early. There are pictures of the author visiting Berlin in 1950 touring the burned out Reichstag, but no details about that. It would have been delightful to read about that, and his impressions of defeated Germany, since Smith spent so much time in Berlin.
2. He doesn’t add quite enough personal thoughts to his book. For instance, he met the woman that would eventually become his wife in Germany? and there is no mention of it (there’s a picture of both of them in the Berlin Tiergarten). A little more of a personal touch would have rounded out the book nicely.
However, these are minor complaints about a solid and throught-provoking book.

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K.A.Goldberg November 26, 2014 at 9:07 am
8 of 9 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars
Solid Narrative of Nazi Germany, June 12, 2008
By 
K.A.Goldberg (Chicago) –

This review is from: Last Train From Berlin: An Eye-Witness Account of Germany at War (Paperback)
This is a tense, realistic 1942 view of Nazi Germany from journalist Howard K. Smith (1914-2002). A CBS reporter in wartime Berlin from 1940-1941, Smith describes life in Nazi Germany, and how people there coped under a totalitarian system waging aggressive war. Readers see how so much of Germany’s Middle Class and industrialists were seduced by Hitler. Smith doesn’t conceal his contempt for Nazism – such reportorial sentiments helped lead to his exit, as had occurred eariler with reporters like Dorothy Thompson and William L. Shirer. This book’s name stems from Smith taking the last train to Switzerland hours before Japan attacked Pearl Harbor – had he left one day later he’d have almost certainly been stopped, held as an enemy detainee, and perhaps disposed of. As it was, this Louisiana native was land-locked in Switzerland for nearly three years, where he continued reporting and wrote these stellar pages. This is a solid narrative about a tragic time and place by a very capable journalist.

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Alen November 26, 2014 at 9:11 am
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars
Cognitex Plus Pregnenolone with Brain Sheild Excellent Daily Supplement, October 21, 2014
By 
Alen

This review is from: Cognitex Pregnenolone with Brain Shield (Gastrodin), 90 Count Softgels (Health and Beauty)
I have been on this product for over a year and find it has helped with my memory and thought-verbal process. I stopped once because of a delay in ordering/shipping and noticed a rapid change back to not being able to verbalize my thoughts clearly and lapses in memory recall (my problem before). Within days of restarting this product the effects were already noticeable. Cognitex with pregnenolone will be one supplement I will continue daily.

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